Common HIPAA Compliance Mistakes

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Our team at Reliant Data Solutions has extensive experience in the tech industry, and we have particular expertise in providing tech support to dental practices. We are thoroughly familiar with the specific challenges that dental professionals face, and we are here to provide the tools and support you need to overcome them. For example, we can help you with all your HIPAA compliance needs, ensuring that your patients’ data remains secure and confidential. Over the years, we have seen many people make mistakes when it comes to HIPAA compliance, and in this article, we’ll go over a few of the most common blunders, so you can avoid repeating them.

Common HIPAA Compliance Mistakes

  • Not Protecting Your Devices. One of the biggest HIPAA violation cases came about in 2012, when someone stole the laptop of a CardioNet worker out of their parked car. The mistake here isn’t having the misfortune to have one’s laptop stolen, it is the failure to safeguard the device to prevent others from accessing the private data stored there. To avoid this, we recommend that you enable encryption on all your company devices, make sure that they are all protected by passwords or other employee authentication measures, and enable remote locking or wiping capabilities.
  • Not Cracking Down on Employee Dishonesty. Another common failure point when it comes to HIPAA compliance is employee dishonesty. Many people have looked at others’ Protected Health Information without proper authorization, acting out of curiosity, spite, or other motivations. In order to prevent this, you need to make sure that any employee caught doing this faces tough sanctions and require regular training and re-training in HIPAA regulations.
  • Not Disposing of PHI Records Properly. A third common issue for HIPAA compliance is failing to dispose of old PHI records properly. Paper records need to be shredded, burned, or pulped to ensure that the information contained in the documents is impossible to read or reconstrue. Digital records need to be cleared (overwritten with non-sensitive data), or the hard drives or storage media purged (exposed to strong magnets to wipe the data), or the physical storage media need to be destroyed altogether.